SunCafé (Los Angeles,CA)

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I rue the day I assumed SunCafé was a commonplace sandwich/salad/smoothie joint. It is so, so, so much more. The converted 1920’s ranch home (formally Zach’s Café) on Ventura Blvd extrudes warmth and comfort while the menu promotes whole food in comforting and familiar forms.

Chef Roy Elam—who shreds guitars along with carrots—heads the inventive menu of colossus salads, raw burgers, golden beet linguini and Reuben themed pizzas… but we had no room for those because we—Elana, Hanna, Alice and I—filled up just about everything else.

Sun Nachos—one of the most popular menu items—were the obvious starter. While debating whether to get the dish with baked blue corn chips or with raw thin-sliced jicama chips, the waitress chimed in “You can do a split order.” So that’s exactly what we did. Topped with “SunChorizo,” nacho cheese, guacamole, pico de gallo, jalapeño, green onion and cashew sour cream this concoction makes the best vegan nachos I’ve had to date. Half of us loved the corn chips, the other half loved the jicama, so a split order is the perfect way to go! Me? I preferred the chips.

The Caesar Salad was not what we expected.  Crisp leaves of romaine lettuce and quartered cherry tomatoes are tossed in raw Caesar dressing with capers then lightly coated in garlic pecan crumble. Apparently there was also raw croutons in here… do you see them? I don’t. We asked the waitress and she swore they crushed up in there. Still, the subtly dressed salad refreshed the pallet; although I may eat my way through the rest of the salad menu before coming back around to the Ceasar.

Raw Cream of Mushroom Soup… I didn’t care for this one. The taste is subtle and refined, but the thick and frothy texture is not for me.

I had nearly given up on all vegan mac & cheese. From the ashes of the sloppy glue or watery plastic of most vegan versions rises the glory of SunCafé’s Mac & Cheese—and it’s gluten free to boot! Slender tubes of quinoa pasta are tossed with tiny diced tomatoes and then broiled in the smoothest-richest-most-perfect-ever cashew cheese sauce. Browned tips of pasta periscope up from the bubbling bath as chewy charred bits stick to the sides was we scrape it from the cast iron dish.

The Farmer’s Market Pizza was an unexpected pleasure. While the gluten free rice flour crust is mearly passable, the toppings sing. Market fresh figs sit atop white sauce (a blend of cashews, garlic, shallots, and nutritional yeast), with smokey tempeh bacon, peppery arugula, meyer lemon vin and drizzled with a balsamic reduction.

Owner Ron Russell approached our table as we debated who got the last slice. A tall (or so I think… we were sitting down) man with a beaming smile who accepted our raving compliments on the pizza but deflected them into the kitchen. “The kitchen suggested this combination… I wasn’t too sure about it. I mean figs? On a pizza…?” We all laughed. This moment of commodity distracted everyone as I stole the last slice.

I would have been happy to end the meal here, but most people love dessert. My friends are no exception. The loose, mouth-coating texture of cheesecake is one of my least favorite desserts ever; but cheesecake is the star of the menu here. I quickly learned why. The Cookie Dough Cheesecake is firm and dense—perfect for me—not too sweet and plenty for four hungry girls. The base is a mixture of cashews, coconut oil, and cacao nibs with other stuff (I’m not sure what) on top. It made a fan out of me; I still haven’t shut up about loving this cheesecake!

SunCafé
10820 Ventura Blvd.
Studio City, CA 91604
(818) 308-7420
suncafe.com

Zoetic Supper Club: A Vegan Pop Up Dinner (Los Angeles, CA)

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The Californication of Detroit’s popular vegan pop-up dinner series Chartreuse unveiled this month as the Zoetic Supper Club.  In the spring of 2013 Chef Corinne Rice moved to Venice, CA, bringing her organic, plant-based pop up dinners with her. A graduate of the raw culinary Matthew Kenney Academy, her dinners express restrained elegance bursting forth with complex flavors that I’ve rarely encountered in raw vegan dining.

All of Zoetic menus are organic, gluten- and soy-free elegant displays of local produce and healthful intent. With roaming locations and musical accompaniment, each Zoetic Supper Club experience will be unique; no two venues, menus or musicians will ever be the same.

I was fortunate to attend the very first of the series—held May 22, 2014 at the G2 Gallery—and enjoyed an evening with new friends and four artistically crafted courses. The incredible Sasha Mari played tunes for us throughout the evening; and through she has directly behind me her music was like a hushed secret in my ear. An intimate dinner like Zoetic brings together like minded people, so although I arrived alone, I carried on conversations with everyone around me. I left with the contact information of a found wood craftsman, a new found interest in exploring the culinary offering of Reno, NV and a new PETA-employed friend.

At my seat I found a BYOB glass of wine and eatable words. Nestled in each napkin was a poem by Jacqueline Suskin to guide us through the evening.

To begin we pluck purple from earth
and know the tender tune of carrot,
sweetness of pea and all hints
of bitter blended with cool cream,
with kind herb and gentle seed.

Follow this with the warmth
of soup that sings its healing verse,
spice of ginger, bright bloom
of chamomile and bold bite
of nasturtium yo balance the cure.

Reliable brassicas steady
the tradition of curry
made sweet by calming coconut
and even sweeter by the grand guide of grape.

Southern sugar sends the final
message with what Mexican reds
can conjure in custard and pulling
its weight in purity the pistachio
provides proof that all can be good
when topped with wisdom
of relish held well by chocolate
and smoked salt.

first | purple carrots. peas. brussel chips. avocado cream. mint. basil. black sesame foam.

This was my favorite dish of the evening. Young peas and floral herbs play so well together. But it was the curls of purple carrots, crisp and smoked with a subtle ‘bacon’ flavor that  amazed me. Before this meal I’d never encountered these flavors in raw food. Simply astounding!

second | ginger. chamomile. nasturtium.

The unexpected soup, different from the published menu. Afterward Chef Rice explained she felt the menu might be too puree-heavy so changed this course to a vivid vegan consommé.  A mild broth with the heat of ginger and one peppery bite of nasturtium.

third | brassicas. saffron coconut curry. cilantro pesto. grapes.

The pale green puree hide a simmering spice that lingered after every bite. The plump florets of rainbow cauliflower, steeped in the coconut curry, were a satisfying end to the savory courses. I swept up every last bit of the cilantro pesto… with my finger!

fourth | Mexican red velvet custard. pistachio pastry. reishi chocolate sauce. smoked salt.

A stunning end. Two quenelle of raw chocolate custard splatted in chocolate relish—a ruddy mushroom—sauce holding a delicate pistachio wafer. It tasted as beautiful as it looked.

The next dinner will he held Saturday July 26, 8pm at C.A.V.E Gallery 1108 Abbot Kinney, Venice… and it’s BYOB!

Basil Thai (Paso Robles, CA)

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Driving the 500 miles between San Francisco and Los Angeles I planned to take my vegan boyfriend to my favorite veggie friendly spot in central California: Thomas Hill Organic in Paso Robles. Unfortunately a private event derailed our plans. Scrolling through Yelp we saw the v-word pop up for Basil Thai and headed that way.

It’s a traditional plastic gilded interior on the Paso Robles square. The staff is friendly and thankfully knowledgeable:  Our waitress let us know that EVERYTHING is made with fish sauce. Releasing exacerbated sighs, the kind that only come after hours of highway driving, the waitress leaded in and whispered that there were two things we could order.

The first dish out were little bites of Meaing Kum ($7). Fresh leaves of spinach leaves are stuffed with roasted coconut, ginger, onion, lime and roasted peanuts. The traditional Miang Kham sauce is made with fish sauce, so the waitress replaced it with a sweet chili sauce. Unsure of what to do, we placed bits of everything into the leaves and shoved it into our mouths. Mixed together, these elements normally used as garnish make a sweet-tart-crunchy starter. I loved it!

Made with sweet soy sauce, the Pad See Eaw Noodles ($15) is the only vegan noodle option. The price is excessive considering the portion, but the wide rice noodles with tofu, carrots and broccoli were fresh and filling. The charred crunchy bits of the chewy noodles noodles were the best part of the dish. We quickly devoured the carrots and broccoli then hopped back on the 101.

I’m incredibly grateful that Basil Thai accommodated us on the long drive home.

Basil Thai 
828 11th St
Paso Robles, CA 93446
(805) 238-9945
basilinpaso.com

Dominick’s (Los Angeles, CA)

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When people describe a restaurant as “Classic Italian,” I’m often confused. Do they mean dried boxed pasta drowning in red sauce or hand rolled al dente noodles bathing in olive oil. I always hope they mean the lather and I always hope it’s just like Dominick’s.

The thought of eating dried pasta at a restaurant haunts me. If it’s not made in house, I’d rather eat at home. But, since fresh pastas of usually made with egg, it hinders my growing interest in vegan dining…er… which this menu is not an obvious example of. I spoke with the manger about their vegan options, and she informed that their fresh pasts is made with flour and water only! Although we didn’t order any during this meal, you can count on me returning for a vegan feats!

The deep fried, risotto wrapped, molten mozzarella Rice Ball ($4 on the The Five O’Clock Meeting menu!) is my all time favorite. Cracking into the rice ball, a  puddle of cheese oozes fourth, tangling in my fork’s tines as I stab at the crisp shell. Powdery Parmesan and minced parsley cling to the molten cheese it’s scooped into my mouth. This is the very best dish on the menu. Always.

The petite bowl of Spiced Marcona Almonds & Parmesan Cheese Chunks ($8) is loaded with flavor. The generous chunks of Parmesan and oil slicked almond are heavy—slowing me down, savoring each bite. Though small, it’s far too much for one person. It’s a great dinner accent and something to nibble on between a meal’s courses.

The Grilled Artichoke ($12) is a simple dish. The nearly unadulterated vegetable arrives with charred edges and a burnt lemon. It’s absolutely delicious but a overpriced to anyone who knows have to prepare an artichokes.

The light Bibb Lettuce with Lemon, Creme Fraiche & Crispy Leeks ($10) is the subtle sleeper of the of the menu. A translucent film of cream clings to the buttery bibb lettuce. Shoestring leeks are crisped in a delicate tempura-like batter and carry a faint saltiness. The flavor of this dish is fleeting, drawing you back to the pale leaves for more and more and more…

As long as late summer figs are still dangling from the trees, I hope the special Fig Salad clings to the menu. Stuffed with a cube of mozzarella, the sauteed fruit is served on a vinegar wilted bed of mixed greens.

Though we didn’t order a vegan pasta, we did order was the Housemade Ricotta Gnocchi with Tomato Sauce, Basil, Pecorino ($16). Smooth cylinders of tender gnocchi drenched in a light tomato sauce that tastes of nothing else. It’s exactly what you would expect from this dish. No more, no less.

I forgot to mention our waitress! My friend instantly spotted her as a favorite instructor at Pop Physique. It was with her permission that we indulged in the Warm Skillet Cookie ($8). The cast iron pan of chocolate chunk cookie is littered with salted almonds and topped with Rocky Road Gelato. It’s a rich with a satisfying warmth that leaves you craving a cardio workout.

As rich and indulgent as chocolate is, the Oven Roasted Peach Shortcake ($8) was my favorite dessert. A polenta shortcake encased in a crystal sugar shell atop housemade peach jam and whipped mascarpone. Served with a side of lightly oven roasted peaches and scattering of rosemary, it the perfect ending to any dinner.

Dominick’s
8715 Beverly Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90048
dominicksrestaurant.com

Tomatomania at Loteria Grill (Los Angeles, CA)

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For most of my life I’ve hated tomatoes. I would eat tomatoes only in their most cooked down and pureed state—aka pizza sauce. It wasn’t until the summer of 2012 when I visited Central California for the Bianco Di Napoli tomato harvest that I dared to eat an unadulterated raw tomato. Standing there in organic fields of Cliff Fong’s Farm, with the summer sun still pulsating through the red flesh, I became a tomato fan.

This past year I’ve pursued tomatoes in their best forms, learning to love this formally forbidden nightshade. I remain picky, you’ll often find the dull slabs of artificially ripened tomatoes lingering in the bottom of my salads bowls. But when a organically grown, vine ripened tomato is presented, I’m all over it!

So when I got an invite to Loteria Grill’s Tomatomania, Five Tomato Dinner, I was thrilled! The menu wasn’t published (and I have a feeling wasn’t decided) until a few days before the event, but I crossed my fingers that it would be vegetarian friendly. The 5 course dinner was curated by a slew of fabulous Los Angeles chefs: Jimmy Shaw, Evan Kleiman, Kris Morningstar, Giselle Wellman, Neal Fraser and Duff Goldman.

The final menu proved not to be vegetarian friendly. The two main courses turned out to be mostly meat with very little namesake tomato. The dishes contained such meager amounts of tomato, there wasn’t a point in plating them without the flesh. So two vegetarian items from the regular menu were substituted. But I was told that my vegetarian request provoked a poignant conversation in the kitchen. In the heat and excitement of planning, little forethought went into the vegetarian options (an important consideration since I was not the only one requesting vegetarian options). I was honored to hear I made the chefs reconsidered their offering. It’s the entire point of my blog: To enjoy existing vegetarian option, celebrate the chefs who take the time to craft delicious plant based meals and encourage others to follow suite.

The meal opened with a Cucumber Margarita with a Tajin rim. I always prefer the gentle cucumbers over the acidic lime in my libations.

The Loteria Grill kitchen offered an appetizer, Molletes con Salsa Mexicana de Colores: sliced baguettes with black beans, heirloom pico de gallo and queso. The soft baguettes tasted distinctly non-homemade, as to be expected from a taqueria. This dish didn’t stand out among the similar ones I’ve had, still, I couldn’t stop popping these bread bites.

The first course was the easiest to vegetarianize, Tomato with Burrata served in a Potato Pancake (sans caviar) by Chef Giselle Wellman. The crisp potato cake, easier to see in the non-veggie version, was fried to a deep black brown, without a smidgen of burn, and paired perfectly with the summer sweet tomato.

My favorite dish of the night, mostly because it was the only as-is vegetarian offering, was the Squash Blossom and Huitlacoche Lasagna by Chef Evan Kleiman and Jimmy Shaw. Tender leaves of pasta curled around sautéed flowers and corn smut in a mild tomato sauce.  Soft and savory, this dish brought together the best of Chef Jimmy Shaw’s Mexican and Chef Evan Kleiman Italian influences.

Chef Kris Morningstar prepared a Swordfish a la Veracruzana with sungold tomatoes… but I had the Calabacitas Tostada topped with Zucchini and Roasted Corn Succotash, Salsa Verde Cruda, Onion, Cilantro and Queso Fresco instead. The massive pile proved to be filling but relatively bland.

Chef Neal Fraser prepared an Achiote-marinated Duck Breast… but I had the Champinones con Epazote Enchiladas with Roasted Tomatillo Sauce instead. Not normally a mushroom fan, the chewy texture of the filling played nicely with the overly soft corn tortilla and tart tomatillo sauce. The ample portion felt a bit ridiculous in a five course tasting dinner, but at least I was guaranteed to not go home hungry.

The final course was the Caprese Panna Cotta by Chef Duff Goldman. It featured the most innovative use of tomato, as a gelée beneath a panna cream finished with a balsamic reduction and a fist full of pine nuts. Made with gelatin, I tried only a few spoonfuls for flavor, but devoured ALL of the pine nuts.

The event was a lot of fun! The chefs made themselves available to the diners, breathing a sigh of relief after their course had been served. This is the first of what will be an annual event and a wonderful way to try the handiwork of our city’s favorite chefs. I hope next year’s dinner takes vegetarian guests into consideration. We love tomatoes too!

Tomatomania at Loteria Grill
6627 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
loteriagrill.com/hollywood

Goldie’s (Los Angeles, CA)

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An impromptu weekday lunch with my mom finally brought me to Goldie’s. The living wall beckoned us from the street but offer little shade for a midday meal. Fortunately, the interior proved to be lovely. Designed by the restaurateur Nick Mathers, it’s been described as Frank Lloyd Wright-meets-lumberyard which doesn’t make any sense to me at all. This is clearly a mid-century derived design accented with Moroccan tiles and knock-off Wegner Elbow chairs.

The smoky kitchen air wafted through the elegantly slit wall directly into the dining room. We figured if we are going to breathe all this smoke we might as well start off with the Grilled Flatbread ($8). Slathered with honey, rosemary and ricotta, the flatbread arrived unsliced on a wooden platter. With butter knives we dully sawed into the tough bread—neither crisp nor chewy—leaving deep groves in the gorgeously finished wooden plate. The ricotta was flavorless, topped with such a scant amount of rosemary and honey that the kitchen may as well have left it off. Flatbreads are no longer on the menu. I understand why.

The Kale Salad ($12) was a much better event. Tender leaves of mixed-age kale tossed in honey dressing with thin slices of granny smith apple and finished with toasted sesame and blushing pink pickled onions. Large and filling, this salad was woefully overdressed. It was so unfortunate considering the how well all the other elements worked together. I definitely would order this again, but with half the dressing.

The Grilled Baby Leeks ($14) were another head-scratcher.  The slender stocks of what looked more like scallions then baby leeks (we asked the waitress and she said they were scallions) were almost impossible to cut through. The pungent puddle taleggio fonduta balanced out the acidity of the pickled seeds. Finished off with a tangle of crispy onions, I found the onions more palatable then the tough leeks.

Finally, the Roasted Carrots ($12) arrived. The charred exteriors, filled with tender sweet flesh, are cooked perfectly. The buttermilk bath envelopes the crunch of the spiced pistachio. This was a phenomenal dish. Too bad the rest of the meal couldn’t match its quality.

Goldie’s
8422 W 3rd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90048
goldiesla.com

Bragg’s Factory Diner (Phoenix, AZ)

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During an absolutely horrible job interview, my potential boss mentioned that he was vegan. I smiled and said “Oh yeah! I’m vegetarian…”

“That’s not the same thing at all” he stated dryly. Ouch.

Well, for reasons besides my eating inclinations, I didn’t get the job. But I did get jolted into thinking about the stark differences between vegetarians and vegans. I guess I always believed we were part of the same team—and we are teammates in a lot of ways! But as I attempt to delve deeper into the vegan lifestyle I’ve discovered difficulties with something I’ve always taken for granted: Breakfast.

For vegetarians, breakfast/brunch is a smorgasbord of benedict, pancakes, waffles, quiches, parfaits… and so on. It’s a egg and dairy farmer’s delight. But I’ve quickly learned that finding vegan friendly breakfasts, especially on a road trip, is shockingly difficult. Before heading to Phoenix, I was sooo thankful to stumble upon Bragg’s Factory Diner on Instagram!

As an architecture nut, the Frank Lloyd Bite ($10) beckoned me. It comes with 2 pancakes, hash browns, eggplant bacon and a biscuit smothered in gravy.The pancakes were stunning—the real vegan at the table gleefully devoured them. They are thin, with a crisp buttery shell, reminiscent of everything wonderful about the McDonald’s breakfast menu.  The hash browns, a fried tangle of noodle-like potato threads, is light in texture and taste. A heavy pour of hot sauce quickly remedied the situation. The eggplant “bacon” was the riskiest element on the plate. As is visually obviously, it is not attempting to mimic pork. The soft slabs of smoky eggplant offer a bacony flavor, but none of the pungent fat or chewy texture. I found them quite addicting. Overall, the deliciousness of the Frank Lloyd Bite was marred only by it’s monochromatic appearance.

I found the biscuit, drenched in mushroom and corn gravy, too gummy for my tastes. But considering how rare it is to find vegan biscuits and gravy, I must applaud the effort.

To balance out the beige, we ordered the King Kale Salad ($8). Topped with medallions of grilled zucchini and a sprinkling of quinoa and walnuts, it’s all tossed in a creamy lemon dressing. I found the size of the kale leaves difficult to eat, so I attacked it with fork and knife. It seems silly and simple, but the barely dressed grilled zucchini slices were the best part of this salad. It’s a lot of roughage to eat, but all that kale was the perfect counterbalance to the carb-fest of potatoes and pancakes!

Overall, the food is neither groundbreaking or outstanding. It’s well executed, explorative and made with heart. It’s the idea stop for any road tripping or local vegan crossing through the desert of breakfast-ville.

Bragg’s Factory Diner
1301 NW Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007
braggsdiner.com

Ba Restaurant (Los Angeles, CA)

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Anyone who has read a book authored by Julia Child or M. F. K. Fisher knows the compelling and historical context of French cuisine. Much of western cooking is driven by the pâté laden, coq au vin covered, lorrained or moules frited plates of this lovely tradition… but none of it persuades my vegetarian interests. So when I stumble upon a French restaurant with tantalizing vegetarian options, it’s a cause for celebration.

And that is exactly what I found at Ba Restaurant in Los Angeles’ Highland Park. The stand out dish is the Mushroom Brûlée ($11), a shallow ramekin of roasted wild mushrooms smother in buttery brie. Flamed licked, the charred edges of cream and rind deliver a faint bitter note, offsetting the earthiness of the dish. A mellow and magnificent starter, far too rich to eat alone.

The menu rotates through various—obliviously market driven—vegetarian dishes. I caught the kitchen on an evening filled with goat cheese dotted roasted Brussels sprouts, roasted fingerling potatoes with endive and a summer salad. The plate was topped with a glistening ruby red tomato slab. All arranged over fresh tomato sauce, it may not pack the flavor punch of duck confit or grilled pork chop, but it’s s delicate and filling entree that leave plenty of room for dessert—which was so good I forgot to photograph it.

One of the most striking element of Ba is the interior. Not so much it’s visual impact (although it is quite lovely inside) but the care the designer (who happens to the chef’s wife) took to ensure an acoustically sound meal. Large heavy curtains drape over the dinning room’s entrance, muffling the noise of service and guests. The upholstered walls and slatted ceiling finish the job, making this one the the most hushed and cozy dinner I’ve experienced in a long time.

Ba Restaurant
5100 York Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90042
restaurantba.com

Cook’s Cuisine (Needles, CA)

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“Before we sit down, I’ll be sure to clarify if they can prepare vegan food,” I reassured myself and Co as we entered. A spunky woman eyed us from the register. With my (always) friendly smile I asked “Can you make vegan Thai food? You know, like no fish sauce…”

She stared at me blankly.

“Ummm… no meat…” I continued.

She stared for another few seconds, then her eyes lit up, “Oh yes yes, I cook from many difference kind of people!” She then went on to explain that she was vegetarian for 4 years and that she didn’t use fish sauce in any of her food because it’s difficult to get in Needles and none of the locals care anyways. She handed us menus every though every single dish was meat based.

“You tell me what you like and I make it.”

“Well, I like summer rolls, anything in peanut sauce…”

“You like curry?” she interrupts.

“Sure…”

“You like yellow curry?”

“Sure…”

So we ended up with Yellow Curry and Vegetable Pad Thai. The curry is sweet, with a touch of spice. She kindly offered me a side of hot sauce since she made it on the milder side, worried that my non-Asian companion may not be spice friendly. The curry bowl was filled this cubes of soft tofu, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini, red pepper and cashews and served with individual bowls of rice. The fresh veggies were also featured in the not oily, but also not that flavorful, Pad Thai. This belly filling vegan meal came to a very fair $14.

For a vegan or vegetarians traveling on the I40, Cook’s Cuisine is a find. Surely the best Thai food for 100 miles… and it’s 100x times better grabbing dinner at Subway.

Cook’s Cuisine
1400 Needles Hwy
Needles, CA 92363
(760) 326-5081

The Vegetarian Option: Weddings 2013

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My 2011 post on vegetarian options at wedding remained one of my most viewed posts on this blog! In the past two years, wedding have become all the more vegetarian friendly… so for your brides, caterers or food porn lovers out there searching for silent/loud/delicious vegetarian options for your affairs, here are my favorites from the past two years:

Dani and Andrew (Los Angeles)

One half of this couple is vegetarian, so options abound. Catered by HerloomLA, this is by far my favorite of this post. You can view the tasting for this wedding here to contrast expectation verses reality.

The Cheese Course, set out before the ceremony even began!

Chives and wild mushroom ragu atop a crispy lemon polenta cake! These totally met the expectation of the tasting samples.

Twice-baked potato with crème fraiche. Not as pretty, but still delicious!

Various breads, pizzas, and fondues. The smoked mozzarella and pumpkin parmesan fondues held up well, but there were no forks out at this point of the service, making this a messy smack. The cheesy pizzas got soggy piled on atop each other in this presentation.

The Spring Pea Salad, full of fresh and crunchy vegetables, held up to its light dressing throughout the evening.

There were a million different kinds of cake in there, each layer was a different flavor. I don’t remember what I had, I was still stuffed from the cheese course!

Malibu Wedding

Over the summer I worked at a wedding at the gorgeous Villa Cascata in Malibu. Again, half the wedding party was vegetarian so there was plenty to gorge my vegetable loving belly on!

Simple Salad with Mango dressing, a flat of Mac’n cheese and a view of the Pacific Ocean! A stellar start to dinner.

The salad was actually not that simple with spinach, avocados, strawberries and pistachios.

Veggie Samosas!

Chewy Chapati. Delicious on its own, but even better with:

Herb and onion flecked Fried Tofu, little Falafel patties, vegetable laced Couscous and Grape Leaves!

The bride’s southern roots appeared in the baskets of Sweet Potato Fries and Cornbread Muffins!

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